When Can a Landlord Terminate a Tenancy?

“For Cause” reasons to terminate a tenancy include when a tenant: 

  • Fails to pay rent
  • Breaches rental agreement
  • Is convicted of Illegal activity on property
  • Threatens violence
  • Fails to cease activities causing nuisance
  • Fails to give access to landlord

Landlord can terminate a tenancy without cause (“no cause”) when:

  • Owner wants to remove a unit from the rental market
  • Owner or family member wants to occupy unit (see exceptions below
  • Substantial rehabilitation to the unit is needed for health and safety purposes

Exceptions:

    • Owner may not terminate a tenancy under the reason of “owner or family member wants to occupy unit” if:
      • The owner or owner’s relative who intends to move into the unit as their primary residence already occupies another dwelling unit on the same property unless the owner or owner’s relative is disabled and needs the unit for their disability. In such a case, the tenant being evicted shall have first right of refusal to rent the other unit.
      • The tenant is 62 years of age or older or is disabled, and has been residing in the unit for at least 10 years; or
      • The tenant is disabled and catastrophically ill and has been residing in the unit for at least one year.
    • Owner may not terminate a tenancy in retaliation of the tenant exercising their rights under the Ordinance
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